Professional Development

THE PATH

THE PATH

YOUR JOURNEY THROUGH
INDIGENOUS CANADA

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THE PATH - YOUR JOURNEY THROUGH INDIGENOUS CANADA

As an expression of our committed response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, the CBA is pleased to offer this accredited online series at a preferential rate to CBA members.   

The program consists of 5 online modules made up of videos and quizzes that focus on the First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada, the history of Indigenous peoples and their relationship with European settlers, the British Crown and the Dominion of Canada. 

These modules set out to demystify some of the legal issues surrounding the Canadian Constitution, the Indian Act, historical and modern treaties, recent rulings by the Supreme Court of Canada and what they mean in practical terms. The final module provides some context to better understand the importance of cultural traditions and values for Indigenous peoples as well as suggestions on how to work and communicate with Indigenous colleagues and partners to strengthen your relationships.

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List of Modules:

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Topic 1: Indians, Inuit and Métis  

Description

Your journey begins with an introduction to First Nations and Inuit, Canada’s original inhabitants. For thousands of years they have explored and settled this hemisphere; hunted, fished and farmed; created trade and political networks; and created a rich mosaic of distinct cultures. You will also learn how the Metis Nation emerged with the birth of the fur trade in this country. Indigenous communities today are found right across Canada, and their national organizations play an important part in our national dialogue.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to:

  • Identify the three Indigenous groups named in the Canadian Constitution.
  • Describe the origins and basic history of Indigenous peoples - First Nations, Métis and Inuit.
  • Describe the historical distinction between “Status” Indians and “Non-Status” Indians.
  • Identify the organizations representing and advocating on behalf  for First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

Topic 2: Name Calling 

Description

This module will help you to demystify the use of such terms as “Indian,” “Native,” “Aboriginal,” “Indigenous”, “First Nation,” “Eskimo,” “Inuit,” and “Métis”, and come to an understanding of which terms to use when identifying various groups in different contexts. You’ll also review and debunk some of the stereotypes and myths propagated in media and popular culture regarding Indigenous peoples.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to:

  • Explain common and enduring stereotypes about First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Canada.  
  • Summarize the history and use of the various terms used to describe Indigenous peoples.
  • Understand what those words mean today, and knowing which terms to use in various situations.
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Topic 1: History: Pre-Contact to the mid Nineteenth Century 

Description 

All cultures have their own stories of how the world was created, how humans came to walk the earth, and how their own people came to be. This topic will introduce you to several creation and origin stories of First Nations and Inuit. The lesson also explores some of the current theories regarding the migrations of paleo-Indigenous peoples to the Americas, and presents an overview of different Indigenous groups that populated Canada prior to European contact. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • Recognize several Indigenous creation and origin stories. 
  • Summarize scientific theories of how and when Indigenous people came to settle in Canada. 
  • Describe the regions inhabited by major Indigenous groups across the country at the time of contact with Europeans.  

Topic 2: Inuit across the North 

Description 

This topic will introduce the major milestones that have marked the Inuit presence in Canada, how that history forms the basis for Inuit land claims, and how each unique Inuit region came to be shaped and defined through the land claim process. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • List  major milestones in Inuit history.
  • Understand the nature and basis for land claims across the North; and
  • Summarize the history and defining moments in the creation of the modern Nunavut, Nunavik, Nunatsiavut and the Inuvialuit regions.
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Topic 1: A Colonial History 

Description

This topic will address some of the defining moments that have shaped the realities faced by Indigenous peoples. These include: the colonial relationship established by the Indian Act; the tragic legacy of residential schools; the hardships imposed by the Inuit relocations; the fostering out and adoption of Indigenous children during the “Sixties Scoop”; and the underlying causes and events that fueled the Oka Crisis. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • Understand the history, background and scope of the Indian Act. 
  • Appreciate the legacy and long-term impact of Residential Schools. 
  • Describe the events and impact of the Inuit Relocations. 
  • Recognize the individual and social impact of the “Sixties Scoop”; and 
  • Summarize the circumstances and historical events that led to the Oka Crisis. 

Topic 2: Positive Advancements in the Past 40 Years 

Description

Although relationships between Indigenous peoples and Canada have been marked by conflict, there is progress. This section highlights the resilience demonstrated by First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples through four decades as they seek a renewed relationship with Canada. Topics include the birth of social movements like Idle No More, the creation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. Finally, this section will introduce you to some successful Indigenous artists and public figures. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • Describe positive social trends and advancements made by Indigenous peoples in the past 40 years. 
  • Summarize the Idle No More movement and other social initiatives. 
  • Explain the need for and work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. 
  • Understand the roots and the mandate of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. 
  • Recognize some famous Indigenous people in Canada.
     
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Topic 1: Understanding Historical Treaties and Métis Assertion of Rights 

Description

In the previous modules, you learned about Canada’s historic relationship with First Nations, Inuit and Métis. In this topic, you will learn about the historical and legal framework that underlies Canada’s current legal and constitutional relationship with Indigenous peoples. Historic and modern-day treaties help to define that relationship; increasingly, Canada’s Indigenous peoples are using them as a basis for asserting rights. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • Recognize the historical and legal nature of a treaty. 
  • Summarize the different types of treaties that have shaped Canada’s relationship with Indigenous peoples. 
  • Understand Métis assertion of rights as Indigenous people. 

Topic 2: Understanding Aboriginal and Métis Rights, Title and Modern Treaties 

Description

This topic discusses the resurgence of Indigenous rights spurred by the Federal government’s “White Paper” which ironically sought to eliminate them. It distinguishes between modern-day treaties and historic and “numbered” treaties, and explains how the courts and International law are evolving to a recognition of rights approach. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • Describe the role of the “White Paper” of 1969 in the resurgence of the modern Indigenous rights movement.
  • Understand how modern treaties differ from historical treaties.
  • Identify the major Supreme Court rulings regarding Aboriginal Title and the Duty to Consult and Accommodate.
  • Discuss the significance of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People.
  • Recognize the impact of the Powley Decision (2003) on Métis Hunting Rights; and
  • Recognize the impact the Daniels Decision (2016) on Canada’s Obligation to the Métis
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Topic 1: Cultural Values and Traditions 

Description

This topic discusses some of the cultural values and traditions of Canada’s Indigenous peoples, and describes how these shape Indigenous perspectives and views of contemporary Canadian society. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • Recognize distinctive cultural values and traditional beliefs of  First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada. 
  • Describe the ways in which cultural and traditional beliefs about the land, family, culture, language and spirituality continue to shape Indigenous perspectives.

Topic 2: Relationship-Building 

Description

In the previous topic, you learned about the role that culture, language, tradition and spirituality play in the lives and perspectives of many Indigenous peoples. These cultural traditions, as well as the history of the relationship between Europeans and Indigenous peoples, also affect their behaviours. This section presents some suggestions on how to work and communicate with Indigenous colleagues and partners and strengthen your relationships with Indigenous peoples. 

Learning Objectives 

Upon completion of this topic you will be able to: 

  • Describe protocols for working with First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities and Elders. 
  • Describe some common verbal and non-verbal styles of communication among First Nations, Inuit and Métis. 
  • Discuss ways of managing multiple cultures and communication styles in the workplace. 
  • Discuss CBA's work in support of Truth and Reconciliation
  • Explain ways in which embracing cultural differences can lead to successful partnerships and business practices; and
  • Understand the importance of becoming culturally aware. 

Accreditation Information

Find a list of CPD hours by province. The programs include five 48-minute modules and will take four hours to complete the entire course.

This program is on-demand and can be done at the registrant's own pace. Upon completion of the program, a certificate can be downloaded.

Registration Information

CBA Member Fee: $95 plus tax

Non-Member Fee: $195 plus tax

Please contact us to request group rates.

The Path was created by a majority Indigenous-owned company and has been developed with First Nations, Inuit and Métis advisors and reviewers. It has also been vetted by an Indigenous lawyer for accuracy related to legal references.

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