Membership Categories

WHERE DO YOU FIT?

New members are always welcome! Select the category most appropriate for you.

Students: Get your CBA membership for only $20 in most jurisdictions (free in Ontario, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Yukon). Available to students enrolled in full-time undergraduate studies at any recognized law school in Canada, NCA students, and Canadian citizens studying at a recognized foreign law faculty.

Articling and Bar Admission Students: Get 75% off your CBA membership. Available to individuals articling with a Canadian law firm or enrolled in a Bar Admissions course (admission to first Canadian law society).

New Lawyers: Get 60% off your CBA membership. Available to lawyers in their first three years of call.

Regular: A lawyer, Quebec notary or judge who has been called to a Canadian Bar. A law professor with a recognized Canadian law degree who is working at a recognized law school in Canada.

Scholar: Get 75% off your CBA membership. Available to individuals eligible under another membership category but currently undertaking full-time graduate legal studies at a recognized law school or Bar Admission studies to be admitted to another Canadian law society.

Retired: Get 50% off your CBA membership. Available to lawyers, Quebec notaries or judges aged 60 years or more, or who have been members in good standing of the Bar or Law Society for 20 years or more, and who have retired by resigning from the Law Society or the Bench.

Associate: Get 50% off your CBA membership. Available to individuals in good standing of a Bar or Law Society outside Canada, and not otherwise eligible for membership under another CBA membership category.  Proof of international designation must be supplied. 

Non-Practicing lawyers: Get 50% off your CBA membership. Eligibility is based on provincial/territorial law societies recognition of non-practicing status.

Part-Time lawyers: Get 50% off your CBA membership. Eligibility is based on provincial/territorial law society or insurer recognition of part-time status; currently, only the Law Society of Upper Canada and the Law Society of British Columbia recognize part-time status.